nahuatl

Mexica Ohui


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  • Review


    One of the most complete courses around. Mexica Ohui is pretty much a (free!) textbook in website form, and as such, it features exercises after each lesson, which is a pretty nice change if you’d like to test your knowledge.

    Go to site

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Mizton’s Nahuatl Course


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  • Review


    This course, taken straight from Unilang, derives from Mizton Pixan’s (polyglot, illustrator and by happy coincidence, a friend of mine) notes while he was learning this language. Therefore, it’s not comprehensive nor will it lead you to fluency, but as a grammar base of Nahuatl, there are few better resources.

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Jordan’s Notes on Nahuatl


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  • Review


    David K. Jordan’s compilation of Classical Nahuatl notes. If you’re only starting out or merely interested in Nahuatl as a language and the Mexica as a former empire, this website is must, as it includes pretty much all the basics you need to know of Nahuatl grammar, phonology and vocabulary. It even features some downloadables (do keep in mind that they are essentially another man’s study notes, so they may be really helpful or not at all, depending on what kind of student you are).

    Go to site

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Freelang


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  • Review


    Freelang is an excellent bidirectional dictionary, albeit an incredibly frills-free one. “Input simple word, get simple definition” is essentially how it works. Nonetheless it is a great resource, particularly for beginners. It hasn’t got the biggest database around, though, so sometimes it may not have the word in Nahuatl for what you were looking for.

    Go to site

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Pueblos Originarios


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  • Review


    The Pueblos Originarios website isn’t only devoted to Nahuatl language and culture, but also to that of many other aboriginal people’s. It’s Nahuatl portion features a small dictionary. It’s decent, but has mostly earned a spot in this list through its comprehensive coverage of old Mexican culture.

    Go to site

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Oregon University Nahuatl Dictionary


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  • Review


    The Oregon University Nahuatl dictionary is a glorious compilation of Classical Nahuatl, which includes other ortographic variants of your searches, as well as manuscript attestations (or what’s easier to understand, sentences translated into English).

    This dictionary may be one of the largest and most comprehensive Nahuatl dictionaries you’ll find online, with one of its benefits being that it is fully trilingual and somewhat closer to a reference book than to a dictionary. However, this may make it slightly hard to navigate for a beginner, as it is quite literally chock full of Mexica history, which (if not your primary reason for learning the language) may look like a bunch of filler to filter through.

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Hablemos Nahuatl


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    A blog with some of the best articles and video contents for this language. Among the blogs kept about this language it is one of the most frequently updated ones, and if you’re interested, it also offers a (paid) course you can download from the same website.

    Go to site

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Aulex


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  • Review


    The dictionary associated with the Ohui course. I find this dictionary amusing in that it has some recent constructions and neologisms other dictionaries don’t have. However, the spelling used for word entries is Modern Nahuatl as opposed to Classic (so “thanks” is “tlasojkamati” instead of “tlazohcamati”). This may be confusing for beginners.

    Go to site

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