dictionary

Lexicoon


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    This Spanish language dictionary has it all–the looks, the functionality, and the attitude! It includes ethymology, pronunciation, sentence part categorization, definition, synonyms, a handy translator to several languages, words related to it, live examples, and recent tendencies in relation to it as well! Definitely a must for beginner and intermediate Spanish language learners.

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Pleco


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    Talking about Pleco without gushing is quite difficult because there are very few dictionary apps that offer as much as Pleco does without charging an outrage. Although Pleco does offer paid updates, its base version (that one can download without paying) is still more useful than other paper AND online dictionaries that do carry a considerable price tag… which means that Pleco’s updates are VERY much worth their price.

    Pleco has so many features that it’s impossible to cover them all, but you can read more about it in my review of it.

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Imiwa?


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    I suspect that every poor college student going through a Japanese course must’ve cried tears of joy when they found out about Imiwa’s existente. It is an iOS dictionary based on Jim Breen’s legendary JMDict project (on which only God knows how many online dictionaries are based), filled with just about every search function you could wish for and with a favorite’s list function so you never forget a word again.

    And how much do you pay for 130,000 English-Japanese entries? Well… zilch. (But if you do find it useful, it’d be nice to donate something to Pierre, Imiwa’s creator.)

    Go to site

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Weblio Japanese-English Dictionary


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    There are few online Japanese dictionaries that are quite as good as Weblio, although in all honesty it’s more a dictionary for intermediate to advanced students. For starters, it has so many criteria with which search a word (such as field of interest, first kana, part of sentence, etc) that it almost seems enough to get lost in, but generally, typing the word you’re looking for, in English OR Japanese, will get you the same word in the other language, its meaning in the other language, how can it be used, synonyms, and more. Not all the dictionaries it draws from have spelling written in furigana, but a few of them do, so don’t be disheartened if you can’t read the kanji!

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Nihongo e-na


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    Nihongo e-na is the largest online collection of links to sites dedicated to learning Japanese. “E-na” actually means “nice!” (as in “niiiice, dude”) in Kansai dialect, which tells you a thing or two about where they want to take things with this website.

    You can find these sites by the following categories: Reading, Writing, Hearing Comprehension, Speaking, Grammar, Vocabulary, Kana, Kanji, Tools, Dictionaries, Culture, Society, and Others. They recently also launched iOS and Android optimized websites, too!

    Go to site

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Freelang


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    Freelang is an excellent bidirectional dictionary, albeit an incredibly frills-free one. “Input simple word, get simple definition” is essentially how it works. Nonetheless it is a great resource, particularly for beginners. It hasn’t got the biggest database around, though, so sometimes it may not have the word in Nahuatl for what you were looking for.

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Pueblos Originarios


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    The Pueblos Originarios website isn’t only devoted to Nahuatl language and culture, but also to that of many other aboriginal people’s. It’s Nahuatl portion features a small dictionary. It’s decent, but has mostly earned a spot in this list through its comprehensive coverage of old Mexican culture.

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Oregon University Nahuatl Dictionary


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    The Oregon University Nahuatl dictionary is a glorious compilation of Classical Nahuatl, which includes other ortographic variants of your searches, as well as manuscript attestations (or what’s easier to understand, sentences translated into English).

    This dictionary may be one of the largest and most comprehensive Nahuatl dictionaries you’ll find online, with one of its benefits being that it is fully trilingual and somewhat closer to a reference book than to a dictionary. However, this may make it slightly hard to navigate for a beginner, as it is quite literally chock full of Mexica history, which (if not your primary reason for learning the language) may look like a bunch of filler to filter through.

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Aulex


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    The dictionary associated with the Ohui course. I find this dictionary amusing in that it has some recent constructions and neologisms other dictionaries don’t have. However, the spelling used for word entries is Modern Nahuatl as opposed to Classic (so “thanks” is “tlasojkamati” instead of “tlazohcamati”). This may be confusing for beginners.

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Merriam-Webster


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    The website for the famous Merriam-Webster dictionary has a thing or two going for it, in terms of size or concept explanation. Like many other sites it has a Word of the Day Section, but my favorite section is the Trend-Watch, where words which have seen a climb in searches are explained, and the reason for their sudden climb in popularity reasoned.

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Dictionary.com


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    Dictionary.com’s sheer reach commands respect. The main site has enough language resources to make any lover of the language of Shakespeare go weak in the knees, including games and blogs with interesting articles on the proper usage of this language. The dictionary and thesaurus sections are compellingly complete, and each dictionary entry comes with audio pronunciation, live usage examples, ethymology and origin for almost every word.

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Academia Mexicana de la Lengua


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    In the Mexican Academy of Language’s website you will find four great Mexican Spanish dictionaries (on this incarnation of the site, you’ll find them on the top left corner, in the main menu). My personal recommendation is the “Diccionario breve de mexicanismos de Guido Gómez de Silva”, which is the most complete Mexican Spanish dictionary you will find on the web. The site also features another “Diccionario de Mexicanismos” (right above Guido Gómez’s), but that one is flash based so it’s not as easy to navigate.

    Go to site

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